Bruce Fuller

Bruce Fuller

Title
Professor
Department
Graduate School of Education
Phone
(510) 643-5362
Research Expertise and Interest
policy analysis and evaluation, reform issues, charter schools, child care, early childhood development, economy and education
Research Description

Bruce Fuller’s work focuses on how public policies aim to penetrate into local organizations–schools and families–to change the behavior or moral commitments of local actors. In his work on decentralizing policy, he shows how school reforms often fail to accomplish these changes, leading him to institutional and political questions around how to construct more effective policies. He pursues these topics in cross-cultural settings, ranging from Latino communities of east Boston to impoverished communities in South Africa.

In the News

March 12, 2020

New funding lifts L.A. schools, but disadvantaged students still lag

High schools in Los Angeles that have received new funding under California’s ambitious 2013 education reform achieved positive results, with clear improvement in student achievement and teacher working conditions. But after five years and $5 billion in fresh funding, educators failed to narrow wide racial disparities in learning, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley.
August 14, 2012

New study links LA Unified’s new schools to elementary student performance benefits

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, examined the Los Angeles School District’s unprecedented school building program and found that thousands of children moving into new elementary schools over the 2002-2008 construction period enjoyed strong achievement gains that equaled up to 35 additional days of instruction, compared with the progress made by the average LA Unified student.

October 20, 2010

Researchers advocate teacher training, mentoring to boost preschool results

Researchers advocate teacher training, mentoring to boost preschool results The report, Lifting Pre-K Quality: Caring and Effective Teachers," says governors and federal leaders should rely less on regulations and more on improving teacher quality to combat the often disappointing benefits of preschool.

In the News

March 12, 2020

New funding lifts L.A. schools, but disadvantaged students still lag

High schools in Los Angeles that have received new funding under California’s ambitious 2013 education reform achieved positive results, with clear improvement in student achievement and teacher working conditions. But after five years and $5 billion in fresh funding, educators failed to narrow wide racial disparities in learning, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley.
August 14, 2012

New study links LA Unified’s new schools to elementary student performance benefits

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, examined the Los Angeles School District’s unprecedented school building program and found that thousands of children moving into new elementary schools over the 2002-2008 construction period enjoyed strong achievement gains that equaled up to 35 additional days of instruction, compared with the progress made by the average LA Unified student.

October 20, 2010

Researchers advocate teacher training, mentoring to boost preschool results

Researchers advocate teacher training, mentoring to boost preschool results The report, Lifting Pre-K Quality: Caring and Effective Teachers," says governors and federal leaders should rely less on regulations and more on improving teacher quality to combat the often disappointing benefits of preschool.

Featured in the Media

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or positions of UC Berkeley.
June 30, 2020
Linda Jacobson
A new analysis of 1,610 pre-K sites in New York City finds classroom quality is lower in sites located in poor neighborhoods and in centers serving higher percentages of Black and Latino children. The study was led by University of California, Berkeley, sociologist Bruce Fuller, who last year participated in a study showing Latino children, particularly those in immigrant families, are increasingly less likely to attend elementary schools with white students. Fuller has also long questioned whether universal preschool models improve outcomes for children from poor families.
July 31, 2019
Kyle Stokes
Latino children in California's public schools are significantly less likely to attend elementary schools with white children than in any other state, and the problem has grown throughout the U.S., according to a new study co-authored by education and public policy professor Bruce Fuller. The trend is very concerning, the researchers report, because "racially segregating students of color ... often corresponds with unfair financing of schools, regressive allocation of quality teachers and culturally limited curricula." On the bright side, and offering hope for solutions, the study found an opposite trend for all students from low-income families, who are now more likely to enter economically integrated schools. "There are many, many young Latino families who ... are becoming more and more educated," Professor Fuller says, "and that allows for movement into more economically-integrated communities. Now [these communities] might still be predominantly Latino, but at least we're achieving economic integration for many, many Latino kids. ... If we can get poor kids in the same classrooms as middle-class kids ... we're probably going to see stronger educational outcomes." For more on this, see our press release at Berkeley News. Other stories on this topic appeared in the Washington Post and Diverse: Issues in Higher Education.
July 30, 2019
Christina Samuels
Latino Children in the U.S. are significantly less likely to attend elementary schools with white children than they were a generation ago, according to a new study co-authored by education and public policy professor Bruce Fuller. The trend is especially true for children from immigrant families. In 1998, the researchers found, K-5 Latino children attended schools in which 40 percent of their classmates were white, but in 2015 that percentage had fallen as low as 5 percent in major urban school districts. On the other hand, the study found an opposite trend for all students from low-income families, who are now more likely to enter economically integrated schools. "There are some devices that I think are being deployed with some success that tend to counteract segregation," Professor Fuller says. These devices include magnet schools, dual-language immersion programs, and redrawing school boundaries to boost socioeconomic diversity. For more on this, see our press release at Berkeley News. Another story on this topic appeared in Education Dive.
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