Gabriel Zucman

Gabriel Zucman

Title
Assistant Professor
Department
Dept of Economics
Research Expertise and Interest
inequality, wealth, taxation

In the News

April 28, 2021

Gabriel Zucman, L&S Economics Professor, Named 2021 Carnegie Fellow

Gabriel Zucman, associate professor of economics at the UC Berkeley College of Letters & Science, associate professor of public policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy, and director of the James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Center on Wealth and Income Inequality, has been selected as one of 26 recipients of the 2021 Andrew Carnegie Fellowship Award.
April 10, 2020

COVID-19: Economic impact, human solutions

The COVID-19 pandemic is confronting every level of the U.S. economy with an unprecedented challenge, and the government must mount a sustained, ambitious economic response lasting months and perhaps years, UC Berkeley economists said in an online forum today.
February 20, 2019

Seven early-career faculty win Sloan Research Fellowships

Seven assistant professors from the fields of astronomy, biology, computer science, economics and statistics have been named 2019 Sloan Research Fellows. They are among 126 scholars from the United States and Canada whose early-career achievements mark them as being among today’s very best scientific minds. Winners receive $70,000 over the course of two years toward a research project.

In the News

April 28, 2021

Gabriel Zucman, L&S Economics Professor, Named 2021 Carnegie Fellow

Gabriel Zucman, associate professor of economics at the UC Berkeley College of Letters & Science, associate professor of public policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy, and director of the James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Center on Wealth and Income Inequality, has been selected as one of 26 recipients of the 2021 Andrew Carnegie Fellowship Award.
April 10, 2020

COVID-19: Economic impact, human solutions

The COVID-19 pandemic is confronting every level of the U.S. economy with an unprecedented challenge, and the government must mount a sustained, ambitious economic response lasting months and perhaps years, UC Berkeley economists said in an online forum today.
February 20, 2019

Seven early-career faculty win Sloan Research Fellowships

Seven assistant professors from the fields of astronomy, biology, computer science, economics and statistics have been named 2019 Sloan Research Fellows. They are among 126 scholars from the United States and Canada whose early-career achievements mark them as being among today’s very best scientific minds. Winners receive $70,000 over the course of two years toward a research project.

Featured in the Media

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or positions of UC Berkeley.
December 9, 2021
The globe's 2,750 billionaires now control 3 percent of all wealth, up from 1 percent in 1995 — that makes them wealthier than half the planet, according to a new report from a group founded by economist Thomas Piketty. The wealth gap is roughly as wide as it was more than a century ago when the Gilded Age led to massive disparities between rich and poor, the World Inequality Lab found. The study was coordinated by Piketty, an expert on inequality known for his book "Capital in the Twenty-First Century," as well as fellow inequality experts Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman of the University of California at Berkeley.
April 28, 2021
Michael T. Nietzel
The Carnegie Corporation of New York announced the 2021 class of Andrew Carnegie Fellows today. UC Berkeley professor of economics Gabriel Zucman is one of the 26 new fellows who will receive $200,000 to fund significant research and writing in the social sciences and humanities on a range of important social issues. A Carnegie Fellow award can be used for a period of up to two years, and it's anticipated that a book or major study will result from a fellow's work.
March 22, 2021
Richard Rubin
The top sliver of high-income Americans dodge significantly more in income taxes than the Internal Revenue Service's methods had previously assumed, according to forthcoming estimates from IRS researchers and academic economists. Research on tax avoidance and evasion can be difficult and imprecise because it requires seeing what has been intentionally hidden. The paper emphasizes that more work is needed to measure tax compliance by high-income Americans. The authors include John Guyton and Patrick Langetieg of the IRS, Max Risch of Carnegie Mellon University and Gabriel Zucman, a University of California, Berkeley economist who has advocated an annual wealth tax.
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