Boubacar Kante

Boubacar Kante

Title
Associate Professor
Department
Division of Electrical Engineering/EECS
Research Expertise and Interest
wave-matter interaction, Nanophotonics, nanoscale photon management, biophysics

In the News

February 25, 2021

Light unbound: Data limits could vanish with new optical antennas

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have found a new way to harness properties of light waves that can radically increase the amount of data they carry. They demonstrated the emission of discrete twisting laser beams from antennas made up of concentric rings roughly equal to the diameter of a human hair, small enough to be placed on computer chips.
June 25, 2020

Record-breaking metalens could revolutionize optical technologies

Traditional lenses — like the ones found in eyeglasses — are bulky, heavy and only focus light across a limited number of wavelengths. A new, ultrathin metalens developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, uses an array of tiny, connected waveguides that resembles a fishnet to focus light at wavelengths spanning from the visible to the infrared with record-breaking efficiencies.

In the News

February 25, 2021

Light unbound: Data limits could vanish with new optical antennas

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have found a new way to harness properties of light waves that can radically increase the amount of data they carry. They demonstrated the emission of discrete twisting laser beams from antennas made up of concentric rings roughly equal to the diameter of a human hair, small enough to be placed on computer chips.
June 25, 2020

Record-breaking metalens could revolutionize optical technologies

Traditional lenses — like the ones found in eyeglasses — are bulky, heavy and only focus light across a limited number of wavelengths. A new, ultrathin metalens developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, uses an array of tiny, connected waveguides that resembles a fishnet to focus light at wavelengths spanning from the visible to the infrared with record-breaking efficiencies.

Featured in the Media

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or positions of UC Berkeley.
February 25, 2021
Alanis Hayal
New research throws wide open the amount of information that can be simultaneously transmitted by a single light source. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have found a new way to harness properties of light waves that can radically increase the amount of data they carry. "It's the first time that lasers producing twisted light have been directly multiplexed," said Boubacar Kanté, Berkeley's Chenming Hu associate professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences. "We've been experiencing an explosion of data in our world, and the communication channels we have now will soon be insufficient for what we need." For more on this, see our press release at Berkeley News.
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