David Whitney

David Whitney

Title
Professor
Department
Dept of Psychology
Phone
510 642-5797
Fax
510 642-5797
Research Expertise and Interest
cognitive neuroscience, cognition, attention, visual perception, vision, visually guided action, human factors
Research Description

The Whitney Lab investigates visual perception, attention, and visually guided action. Specific areas of interest include motion perception, perceptual localization, object and face recognition, scene perception, and visuomotor behavior.  Using a variety of techniques, including psychophysics, functional neuroimaging, and transcranial magnetic stimulation, they study visual and visuomotor function, with the goal of understanding the perceptual, cognitive, and neural mechanisms that allow humans to perceive and interact with objects in a dynamic world.

In the News

January 12, 2022

Like our social media feeds, our brains take a little while to update

Like our social media feeds, our brains are constantly uploading rich, visual stimuli. But instead of seeing the latest image in real time, we actually see earlier versions because our brain’s refresh time is about 15 seconds, according to new UC Berkeley research.
February 26, 2019

Face it. Our faces don’t always reveal our true emotions

A new study from UC Berkeley challenges decades of research positing that emotional intelligence and recognition are based largely on the ability to read micro-expressions signaling happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, disgust, contempt and other positive and negative moods and sentiments.
January 19, 2017

Why the lights don’t dim when we blink

Every few seconds, our eyelids automatically shutter and our eyeballs roll back in their sockets. So why doesn’t blinking plunge us into intermittent darkness and light?

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In the News

January 12, 2022

Like our social media feeds, our brains take a little while to update

Like our social media feeds, our brains are constantly uploading rich, visual stimuli. But instead of seeing the latest image in real time, we actually see earlier versions because our brain’s refresh time is about 15 seconds, according to new UC Berkeley research.
February 26, 2019

Face it. Our faces don’t always reveal our true emotions

A new study from UC Berkeley challenges decades of research positing that emotional intelligence and recognition are based largely on the ability to read micro-expressions signaling happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, disgust, contempt and other positive and negative moods and sentiments.
January 19, 2017

Why the lights don’t dim when we blink

Every few seconds, our eyelids automatically shutter and our eyeballs roll back in their sockets. So why doesn’t blinking plunge us into intermittent darkness and light?
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