David Broockman

David Broockman

Title
Associate Professor
Department
Dept of Political Science
Research Expertise and Interest
political representation, elections

In the News

June 26, 2020

Want to persuade an opponent? Try listening, Berkeley scholar says

The nation is locked in a state of polarization unprecedented in the past half-century, with deep, volatile divisions around issues of politics, race, religion and the environment. These issues can split families, break friendships and create enormous stress in communities — and yet, having a constructive discussion about the disagreements often seems impossible.

In the News

June 26, 2020

Want to persuade an opponent? Try listening, Berkeley scholar says

The nation is locked in a state of polarization unprecedented in the past half-century, with deep, volatile divisions around issues of politics, race, religion and the environment. These issues can split families, break friendships and create enormous stress in communities — and yet, having a constructive discussion about the disagreements often seems impossible.

Featured in the Media

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or positions of UC Berkeley.
March 3, 2020
Michelle Goldberg
If the Democrats nominate Bernie Sanders, they will be exchanging some of the most reliable voters for some of the least, a new survey of more than 40,000 people suggests. The study, conducted by associate political science professor David Broockman and Joshua Kalla, a colleague from Yale, found that when they weighted their numbers, as polls usually do, to reflect the demographics of the population, rather than those of likely voters, it looks like Sanders would be the best bet to beat Trump. But, they say, there's a big difference between the people who actually vote and the people who can, and that's a discrepancy their survey addressed. Youth turnout would have to reach unprecedented rates for him to win, the survey suggests. They write in their report: "Given how many voters say they would switch to Trump in head-to-heads against Sanders compared to the more moderate candidates, the surge in youth turnout Sanders would require to gain back this ground is large: around 11 percentage points." Their report is available here.
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