Brian A. Barsky

Brian A. Barsky

Professor of Computer Science, Affiliate Professor of Optometry and Vision Science
Division of Computer Science/EECS
School of Optometry
(510) 642-9838
(510) 642-5775
Research Expertise and Interest
computer science, geometric design and modeling, computer graphics, computer aided cornea modeling and visualization, medical imaging, virtual environments for surgical simulation

Brian A. Barsky research interests include computer aided geometric design and modeling, interactive three-dimensional computer graphics, visualization in scientific computing, computer aided cornea modeling and visualization, medical imaging, and virtual environments for surgical simulation. He has been working in spline curve/surface representation and their applications in computer graphics and geometric modeling for many years. He is applying his knowledge of curve/surface representations as well as his computer graphics experience to improving videokeratography and corneal topographic mapping, forming a mathematical model of the cornea, and providing computer visualization of patients' corneas to clinicians. This has applications in the design and fabrication of contact lenses, and in laser vision correction surgery. His current research, called Vision-Realistic Rendering is developing new three-dimensional rendering techniques for the computer generation of synthetic images that will simulate the vision of specific individuals based on their actual patient data using measurements from a instrument a Shack-Hartmann wavefront aberrometery device. This research forms the OPTICAL (OPtics and Topography Involving Cornea and Lens) project.

In the News

July 29, 2014

Vision-correcting display makes reading glasses so yesterday

Researchers at UC Berkeley are developing vision-correcting displays that can compensate for a viewer’s visual impairments to create sharp images without the need for glasses or contact lenses. The technology could potentially help those who currently need corrective lenses to use their smartphones, tablets and computers, and could one day aid people with more complex visual problems.