Arthur Reingold

Arthur Reingold

Title
Professor of Public Health, Division Head of Epidemiology & Biostatistics
Department
School of Public Health
Phone
(510) 642-0327
Fax
(510) 643-5056
Research Expertise and Interest
public health, epidemiology, infectious diseases, biostatistics
Research Description

Arthur Reingold is a professor in the School of Public Health.  His research interests include: opportunistic infections in AIDS patients, interrelationship between tuberculosis and AIDS in developing countries, emerging and re-emerging infections in the United States and in developing countries, and vaccine preventable diseases in the U.S. and in developing countries.

In the News

November 10, 2011

Wood smoke from cooking fires linked to pneumonia, cognitive impacts

UC Berkeley-led researchers have found a dramatic one-third reduction in severe pneumonia diagnoses among children in homes with smoke-reducing chimneys on their cookstoves. Reducing wood smoke could have a major impact on the burden of pneumonia, the leading cause of child mortality in the world, the researchers said. A separate pilot study also found a link between prenatal maternal exposure to woodsmoke and poorer performance in markers for IQ among school-aged children.

March 18, 2011

Echoes of Mengele and Tuskegee, this time in Guatemala

Medical historian Susan Reverby, who first revealed postwar U.S. government medical experiments on Guatemalan prisoners and mental patients, said the story “fits the trope of a grade-B horror move.” But she warned a Berkeley audience that it’s “too easy” to distance ourselves from those who conducted the research.

In the News

November 10, 2011

Wood smoke from cooking fires linked to pneumonia, cognitive impacts

UC Berkeley-led researchers have found a dramatic one-third reduction in severe pneumonia diagnoses among children in homes with smoke-reducing chimneys on their cookstoves. Reducing wood smoke could have a major impact on the burden of pneumonia, the leading cause of child mortality in the world, the researchers said. A separate pilot study also found a link between prenatal maternal exposure to woodsmoke and poorer performance in markers for IQ among school-aged children.

March 18, 2011

Echoes of Mengele and Tuskegee, this time in Guatemala

Medical historian Susan Reverby, who first revealed postwar U.S. government medical experiments on Guatemalan prisoners and mental patients, said the story “fits the trope of a grade-B horror move.” But she warned a Berkeley audience that it’s “too easy” to distance ourselves from those who conducted the research.

Featured in the Media

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or positions of UC Berkeley.
July 21, 2020
Mattias Hoz
Three UC Berkeley health experts discuss recent reports of employee COVID-19 infections at Berkeley Bowl, Whole Foods and other local businesses. "As long as customers are wearing a mask and staying more than six feet away from employees (who should also be wearing masks), they should be safe," said UC Berkeley public health professor John Swartzberg. UC Berkeley public health professor Arthur Reingold seconded Swartzberg's assessment of indoor transmission, adding that stores with infected employees should communicate with Berkeley's Public Health Division to decide appropriate cleaning procedures and whether to close. "Transmission is mostly a risk with prolonged indoor contact, and much less likely with brief customer-employee encounters," Reingold said. "There might be a better case to be made about possible transmission to other employees who interact frequently in the store." UC Berkeley public health professor Malcolm Potts stressed the importance of following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's guidelines in order to prevent COVID-19's spread. Potts also believes that Alameda County and the Berkeley Public Health Division should follow California Gov. Gavin Newsom's guidance regarding business closures.
April 3, 2020
Peter Fimrite
Doctors Art Reingold and John Swartzberg, public health professors at Berkeley, are among a number of the "top minds in their fields" profiled for this story on Bay Area experts who are working tirelessly to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Reingold, director of the CDC-funded California Emerging Infections Program and head of Berkeley's epidemiology and biostatistics departments, is working with the state and Bay Area counties to coordinate their responses to the pandemic, and he's also launching a study to test hospital patients with pneumonia to see if they're infected with the virus. While he expects there to be a vaccine for COVID-19 eventually, he says: "I don't think anybody who knows about infectious diseases will be surprised if (COVID-19) became seasonal." Dr. Swartzberg, a professor emeritus, is sharing his infectious-disease expertise with the media to assure the public receives accurate information. "It's critical that we have a voice because we're living in a very anti-science era," he says. He's spending as many as 14 hours a day learning everything he can about COVID-19 and sharing that information with the media. "Although we don't know nearly what we need to know, we have learned an enormous amount in just two months," he says. "I don't think the public realizes what an important role journalism plays." Speaking of how the unprepared and underequipped the U.S. was for this crisis because of decades of underfunded public health programs, he says: "It's really been a horrific thing to see. ... We've learned a lot about what happens to society when we fail to fund public health." Dr. Swartzberg was also quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle (1) and San Francisco Chronicle (2), U.S. News & World Report, Mercury News (1), Mercury News (2), Yahoo! News and California EPeak.
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