Jose Carmena
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Neuroscience
Division of Electrical Engineering/EECS, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute
carmena@eecs.berkeley.edu
(510) 643-2430

Research Expertise and Interest

brain-machine interfaces, neural ensemble computation, neuroprosthetics, sensorimotor learning and control

Description

My research program in neural engineering and systems neuroscience is aimed at understanding the neural basis of sensorimotor learning and control, and at building the science and engineering base that will allow the creation of reliable neuroprosthetic systems for the severely disabled.

At the Brain-Machine Interface Systems Lab we use electrophysiological, behavioral and computational techniques to ask scientific questions about how the brain controls movement, as well as to achieve the technological milestones required to bring BMI to the clinical realm.

In Research News

brain
October 14, 2016

Four UC Berkeley research teams will share $1.7 million from the federal government’s BRAIN initiative, part of $70 million in new grants announced Thursday, Oct. 13, by the National Institutes of Health.

sensor mote
August 3, 2016

UC Berkeley engineers have built the first dust-sized, wireless sensors that can be implanted in the body, bringing closer the day when a Fitbit-like device could monitor internal nerves, muscles or organs in real time.

Brain
May 27, 2014

Neuroscientists, engineers and physicians are teaming up for an ambitious five-year, $26 million project to develop new techniques for tackling mental illness.

April 18, 2014

When Hollywood knocked on the doors of UC Berkeley engineering professors Michel Maharbiz and Jose Carmena, the researchers answered. Director Wally Pfister tapped their expertise in neural engineering and brain-machine interfaces during the filming of his movie, “Transcendence,” which opens in theaters April 18.

April 7, 2014

“Transcendence” director Wally Pfister, Oscar®-winning cinematographer (“Inception”), will come to UC Berkeley, for a screening of exclusive film clips and audience Q&A.

Carmena & Maharbiz UC Berkeley
March 25, 2013

It still sounds futuristic, but the time is approaching when people paralyzed by stroke or spinal cord injury will be able to regain the experience of movement. Neuroengineer Jose Carmena and bioengineer Michel Maharbiz have joined forces in a project supported by the Bakar Fellows Program to move this technology from the laboratory to the real world.

July 19, 2012

In its first year, the initiative will give research innovations by six early-career UC Berkeley faculty members — including technologies to move prosthetic limbs with the power of thought and to control Argentine ants using their own pheromones — a significant boost from the lab to the market.

March 24, 2011

Researchers at UC Berkeley and UCSF have launched the joint Center for Neural Engineering and Prostheses to develop technology that can translate brain signals into movements controlling prosthetic limbs, circumventing damaged or missing neural circuits in people suffering from disabling conditions.

September 20, 2010

When it comes to conducting complex tasks, it turns out that the brain needs rhythm, according to UC Berkeley researchers. Neuroscientists have found that cortical rhythms, or oscillations, can effectively rally groups of neurons in widely dispersed regions of the brain to engage in coordinated activity, much like a conductor will summon up various sections of an orchestra in a symphony.

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