Stephen Shortell

Stephen Shortell

Title
Professor
Department
Dept of Sociology
Haas School of Business
Phone
(510) 642-2082
Fax
(510) 643-5056
Research Expertise and Interest
health care systems, strategy change and adaptation, organizational performance, organizational and managerial correlates of continuous quality improvement, health care outcomes, empirical analysis of physician-organizational relationship
Research Description

Stephen M. Shortell is a Professor of Health Policy and Management and Dean Emeritus whose expertise is in policies and practices to reform health care delivery and improve the value of care (lower cost and higher quality) provided to patients.

In the News

April 20, 2021

Dean Emeritus Stephen Shortell named to Modern Healthcare’s Hall of Fame

The UC Berkeley School of Public Health is very pleased to announce that Stephen Shortell, PhD, MPH, MBA, UC Berkeley School of Public Health Dean Emeritus and Blue Cross of California Distinguished Professor of Health Policy and Management Emeritus, has been named to Modern Healthcare’s Hall of Fame for his visionary leadership, relentless dedication to timely and relevant research, and extraordinary contributions to the healthcare field.
May 4, 2020

The lasting impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our healthcare delivery system

As the COVID-19 pandemic rages across the country, it has brought unprecedented strain on hospitals and clinics, from a shortage of testing and medical supplies to issues in access among rural and underserved populations. The disease has put a spotlight on some of these inequities, while also revealing holes in the healthcare delivery system that can have lasting side effects on patients and providers.
March 10, 2020

America’s health insurance gaps could speed spread of coronavirus

While public health officials and policymakers race to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus COVID-19 in the United States, they must also grapple with a daunting reality: Approximately 27 million Americans, or about 9% of the population, live without any form of health insurance. In the state of California, those without insurance number about 3 million and about 7.5% of the population.

In the News

April 20, 2021

Dean Emeritus Stephen Shortell named to Modern Healthcare’s Hall of Fame

The UC Berkeley School of Public Health is very pleased to announce that Stephen Shortell, PhD, MPH, MBA, UC Berkeley School of Public Health Dean Emeritus and Blue Cross of California Distinguished Professor of Health Policy and Management Emeritus, has been named to Modern Healthcare’s Hall of Fame for his visionary leadership, relentless dedication to timely and relevant research, and extraordinary contributions to the healthcare field.
May 4, 2020

The lasting impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our healthcare delivery system

As the COVID-19 pandemic rages across the country, it has brought unprecedented strain on hospitals and clinics, from a shortage of testing and medical supplies to issues in access among rural and underserved populations. The disease has put a spotlight on some of these inequities, while also revealing holes in the healthcare delivery system that can have lasting side effects on patients and providers.
March 10, 2020

America’s health insurance gaps could speed spread of coronavirus

While public health officials and policymakers race to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus COVID-19 in the United States, they must also grapple with a daunting reality: Approximately 27 million Americans, or about 9% of the population, live without any form of health insurance. In the state of California, those without insurance number about 3 million and about 7.5% of the population.

Featured in the Media

Please note: The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or positions of UC Berkeley.
February 11, 2019
Catherine Ho
Public health professors Richard Scheffler and Stephen Shortell have issued a paper proposing a path to universal health coverage in California that would provide coverage for 3 million currently uninsured Californians. The plan, estimated to cost $17.3 billion a year, would rely on a mix of new taxes, contributions from the state's general fund, and premium payments. Professors Scheffler and Shortell presented their plan to a group of California health policy researchers and advocates on Friday. "We're hoping for some interest from Sacramento," professor Scheffler says. Ken Jacobs, chair of Berkeley's Labor Center says he thinks the $17 billion cost-estimate is too high, since it doesn't take into account federal funds that the state could access if it were to expand Medi-Cal to more uninsured people. "I look at the (financing) as throwing some ideas on the table to start a discussion," he says.
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