Associate Professor of Latin American Literature and Culture
Department of Spanish and Portuguese
etarica@berkeley.edu

Research Expertise and Interest

Latin America, Mexico, race, nationalism, Spanish, mestizo, Indians, Andes, Bolivia, Peru, Holocaust, Quechua

Description

My research is primarily concerned with race and nation in modern Spanish America, especially with discourses of mestizaje and indigenismo in Mexico and the Andes. It has led to an ongoing fascination with the work of writers such as José María Arguedas, Jesús Lara, and Rosario Castellanos. My book, Intimate Indigenismo: The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism (University of Minnesota Press, 2008), examines how these authors and others created an autobiographical indigenista literary aesthetic in the mid-twentieth century that attempted to challenge existing racial hierarchies and reflected a new concept of national subjectivity. I have also been interested in the literary practice of Quechua-Spanish translation in Peru and Bolivia, and have undertaken many years of Quechua language study. My current research concerns the use of the Holocaust in Latin America to describe state violence, colonialism and slavery. I have also published in the area of French Caribbean literature and post-colonial studies.

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